RaboResearch - Economic Research

Special

India: Economic Outlook 2020

We forecast economic growth in India of 5.1% for fiscal year 2019/20 and 5.7% for 2020/21. Although we expect the economy to have bottomed out, ongoing structural issues are expected to weigh on India’s medium- and longer-term growth potential.

Special

Nowcasting the Indian economy

In this Special we present our new nowcasting methodology for the Indian economy. Our combined model predicts an economic growth for calendar 2018Q4 of 6.3%, which would imply a significant slowdown of economic activity after the already disappointing GDP print of 7.1% in Q3.

Economic Report

India: 2019 Economic Outlook

In 2019, we expect the Indian economy to continue to be the global outperformer in terms of economic growth. There are however substantial downside risks, such as a defeat of Modi’s BJP in the general election and an escalation of the US-China trade war.

Economic Report

India: where is the negative impact of demonetization?

The Indian economy grew by 7% in Q4 of 2016, which is surprising given that India was struck by an unexpected demonetization operation. The explanation can be found in underrepresentation of the informal economy in statistics and overestimation of the role of the private corporate sector.

Special Dutch version

Outlook 2016: Global Economy

Global growth holds up in 2016, but does not accelerate. With the US poised to hike interest rates, the rest of the world waits anxiously. Normalization of monetary policy poses economic risks, but so does keeping it too loose for too long.

Special

Innovation in China and India

The growth performance of India and China has been astonishing. This paper considers their innovative performance, now and in the future. It looks at the various factors driving innovation, as well as the obstacles that China and India need to overcome.

Economic Report

India's capital account: open sesame

For India, the debate to fully open the capital account is a long-standing one. This Special Report elaborates on why India needs foreign capital and demonstrates that the country has already been gradually opening the capital account. This has led to India being in fact more open than meets the eye, but still has a long way to go.